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rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
's that for a variety of weather. ? temperatures now at 94 at dallas. 93 attacks in mississippi. look at the cooler air and a pool of ear infections of ontario. quite interesting. a high yesterday. the key here has been extraordinary. that is not uncommon in texas to have long strings of warm weather. this has been persistent heat. for us we are in the sun and watching this field of cumulus clouds. those are the ones that might produce scattered thunderstorms. look at this we have had 2.96 in. of rain since july. the normal is quite a bit more than that. this ranks among the driest 27% all year since july 1st to occur here in 142 years of data. only 64% of average. that is why we have been hearing from folks that it is a little bit dry. rainfall projections but is around half an inch. the amounts never fall evenly. that is assault normal amount of rent. and this summer that has also been a little cooler than average. 6.7 degrees cooler than last summer. only 7¢ a degree below the historic average for summer. it has been a near normal for summer. it seems cool. june july and august have all shown sligh
. doesn't that sound like east of the mississippi. the jackpot surging to $448 million. hours before that drawing as millions line up hoping they would be the lucky winners. we will have a live report from one of the locations coming up. >>> let's go to a fox news alert. the manhunt for kidnapping of two children. amber alert in states of oregon and washington. this after the suspect's car was believed to have been spotted heading north. anna kooiman is here. she has the latest details on the story. what do we know this morning? >> this is new overnight. oregon state police saying there was a possible sighting of james dimaggio's nissan and another 15 miles away along the same highway in oregon. >> we are trying to get as many people out there looking for that vehicle with that plate and with the suspect and what we hope are two children in that vehicle. >> dimaggio may be headed to canada. the close family friend is accused of murdering the mother of hannah and ethan anderson and setting the house on fire. police found her body inside along with the remains of a child possibly 8-yea
to go back. all of that plus breaking news. there was a miracle today in oxford, mississippi. reinforced with scratch- resistant glass and a unibody made kevlar strong. okay google now. call my droid. the new droid ultra by motorola. when strength matters, droid does. ♪ the joint is jumpin' osteo bi-flex® helps strengthen your joints.° like calcium supplements can help your bones, osteo bi-flex can help your joints.° osteo bi-flex... the best stuff in the joint.™ now in joint and muscle formula. >> shepard: u.s. senator ted cruz says nothing against canada but is he an american. he was indeed born in canada but his mother is a u.s. citizen. he says he actually has dual citizenship both countries. now he plans to give up the canadian citizenship. senator cruz recently won a straw poll of 2016 conservative denver. made two trips to iowa. home of the nation's first in the nation presidential contest and staffers say this week is he planning to visit new hampshire. the first primary state san diego mayor bob filner is trying to settle a sexual harassment lawsuit against him from the c
office is located in jackson mississippi. i have been with a head start since 1988 and i am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration . >> i'm the associate director for education income maintenance of labor, part of the executive office of the president. we oversee the budgets of a number of federal agencies including education and the administration for children family. >> and the director of policy and planning. i started my 20 years ago. i'm really happy to be it today. >> was president budgets, policy, and economic cover tentative. i worked for secretary sibila is set the department of health and human services. >> i'm the managing director for economic policy here at the center for american progress. deficits and debt. >> was wondering if we could start with you. we heard numbers mentioned in the introduction. i wonder he might drill down on the more. the office has some additional information. maybe even what we might be seeing if sequestration continues. >> let me start. our topline numbers of children now. that's about 6,000 infants and todd
lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s, you know, who lived there? well, as i was driving, you looked closer, there was puffs of smoke coming from the roof. it was not someone who lived there. someone was still living here in the year 2002, 2003. one day, myself and matt black, a photographer who, you know, is kind of a modern day dorothy lang, evans, we pulledded off the side of the road, came over the railroad tracks across this little dirt road here, across from this vineyard, and we pulled up to the shack. it was in better shape then, but a tarp paper shack, and as we walked up, there were rabbit furs that had been -- that were hammered on to the wall. i remember knocking once, twice, and this place was on stilts. the door creeked open, and there stood this black man who looked like he'd been lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s. he had a stutter. in fact, later he told us that he came west with a stutter, one state at a time. his name was james dixon, 95, he was living here and had since the 40s. he was part of the migration of blacks who did something that no blacks in ameri
meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your remember? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to member of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talked about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equatable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we thought we were more militant than
that these were phoneo scandals like the mississippi river they keep rolling and keeps getting bigger. i think the republicans are doing well. i think they are very methodical and are not hysterical. they are pursuing it and it will take time but they are pulling on it a thread at a time. >> what about that? if it starts expanding beyond the irs that starts to become more of a problem for the administration. >> they are not supposed to share information but the threat would be that they are sharing information for political purposes to undermine conservatives. in this situation that is not clear. they shared it with the enforcement division of the federal elections commission. so there could be a legitimate reason to see if somebody has tax exempt status to see what they are requesting and then requesting similar status from irs. we don't know. but the idea is and i think that there was testimony from lerner that there had been no sharing of data whatsoever. so now we have an exception to the rule apparently and of course that compounds all the suspicious about lerner and the fact that she has
gain, long-term rip. finally the ugly, a failed attempt to outrun the law. a suspect in mississippi tried to jump into a river to get away from police but there was one problem. he was still wearing handcuffs and then he needed to be rescued. >> time for your favorite viral video of the week. was it the bowler whose chances for a perfect game was shattered by a malfunctioning machine, the naked fan at the concert or a door -- dog who opened the door for his three-legged friend? >> rachel says i'm glad he got tackled. that is what should when you do something stupid like that. >> kathy tweets how cute is that? what a moment. it looks like man's best friend is also dog's best friend. >> the web page poll was tied between the bowler and the dog. >> have a good weekend. "fox & friends" starts right now. >> great to be here at "fox & friends." it is the ninth of august, 2013. i'm anna kooiman in for gretchen carlson. >>> a dangerous twist to an already disturbing story. authorities warning the california man who allegedly kidnapped the 16-year-old girl after killing her mother and possib
of the flood mitigation program that the corps of engineers engages in, we are losing much of the mississippi delta. up theseeep putting barriers to keep the channel of the river to keep it from going onto croplands and housing developments, you are losing all the silt to create the barrier islands to build up that delta to allow for the land to keep being recharged. this is part of the law of unintended consequences. housingep encouraging development closer and closer to coasts and rivers, you are losing nature's ability to mitigate itself. guest: you are absolutely right. that is one of the issues of how we manage the mississippi river and how it affects louisiana along with natural subsidence and the issues of canals for oil and gas drilling and the of those nature. provided are has withe either to wetlands dunes and beaches and as we encroach on that, we are reducing the ability for mother nature to respond and be able to protect us and that increases our flood losses. hurricane result of sandy, more than 30,000 buildings in new york city were in a flood controlled area that is now -- th
angel alumni groups exist from schools including harvard, march kwet and the university of mississippi. schools with a strong sense of spirit and entrepreneurial, computer, math and science programs. bayler university is one of them. >> we are one of four kpos selected to actually present at their angel breakfast. after the presentation we had six weeks of due diligence where they had to go through and interview us and try to poke holes in the business and makd sure we will a viable investment. >> allowing small and medium size businesses to set up e-commerce sites in a few minutes. preferred stock giving grubs money for marketing new hires. he says it should get the firm to its goal of revenue in the low 7 figures in 2014. that's a score for students, alumni as well as the school, bill. >> that's a great idea. get those alumni in there and use their expertise and funds. >> you mentor them and fund them as well. >> thanks very much. stocks made it two for two but just barely. what happens tomorrow? >> stock pros will give you a leg up on friday's stock market action, bill, when we come
, kansas, massachusetts, maryland, michigan, minnesota, mississippi, montana, new hampshire, new mexico and washington state. >> good for mississippi. >> bill: how about that. unfortunately, there are still too many kids who are suffering from obesity. one in eight preschoolers in the united states is obese according to the cdc. a third of u.s. children and teens and still more than 2/3 of adults. so you know, we're not out of the woods yet but some good news on that front. president obama talked about this last night with jay leno and he gave some credit where i think credit is due. >> obama: to michelle's credit, the let's move initiative that she's been involved with, that has gotten so many folks all around the country doing stuff to help kids exercise and eat right, for the first time in a long time, we've started to see some modest reduction in childhood obesity. [ applause ] >> bill: very important cause that the first lady has taken on. i think she's done a damn good job of it. and she's had people in the white house. she's done videos. you know what? it's working! we just gotta
, mississippi, at "the advocate," a historically african-american newspaper. but "the advocate" had a history of being firebombed, a fact that worried his mother, so that did not last long. mr. jealous was also the executive director of the national newspapers publishers association, which represents african american focused, owned, and operated newspapers. what may have been his biggest advocacy challenge is how he courted his wife and the struggle to keep her and win her over with little money and a new job in d.c. he succeeded, however, and is married to lia, and the couple have two young children. but at the core of what mr. jealous is speaking about today, yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. five decades since martin luther king spoke, the nation has its first black president, but still has serious issues for the african-american people, including record incarceration, double digit unemployment, ballot box suppression, and youth violence. the killing of trayvon martin brought back racial concerns to the front pages. questions remain if the naacp, like m
of mississippi. meredith integrated ole miss back in 1962, becoming the first black student to enroll at the all-white university in the heart of the deep south. segregation is rioted on his first day in campus, forcing president kennedy to send in the national guard to restore order. but james meredith would go on to graduate and continue to advocate for civil rights. his courage is an example to all of us. we're celebrating that kind of courage this friday in a special edition of "politics nation" covering the march on washington 50 years later. joining me, martin luther king iii and congressman john lewis as we look back on dr. king's dream and look ahead to the work yet to be done. it's all on the night before the march on washington that i'll lead with martin luther king iii. we hope you'll tune into that show and join us for the march. yeah? then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. silence. are you in good hands? apply cold therapy in the first 24 hours. but not just any cold. i only use new ther
mississippi river valley. sunny and hot in the pacific northwest. heat continues in the southwest. sunday, sunday, a gorgeous day from the great lakes into new england. more wet weather, though, mid-atlantic state down into the southeast. atlanta is over 200% of the rain it should have for this time of the year. we're also looking at a lot of >> good morning. there is a chance for some light rain showers to start today. some scattered strong thunderstorms will develop this afternoon. >>> that's your latest weather. >>> thanks. every day there is a new health study out. everything from cutting your cancer risk with with garlic to why youight not be get a good night's sleep. >> here to break down the biggest headlines in health are here and adam the director of gynecology in connecticut. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> first, we have been talking about this one, first out of canada, a study showed 30 to 40% of couples are sleeping apart. >> that's right. i don't think it's just in canada. the u.s. surveys have this as well. but the good news is it's not necessarily a bad thing. slee
-- guest: the idea is that each state is supposed to have one. it is problematic in some seo --mississippi, in some oun -- some states and counties, there may only be one. there are multistate plans, which we haven't mentioned before. the people who designed the law and who wrote it foresaw the chance that in some parts of the country there might not be sufficient competition. there are provisions to have at least one nonprofit of the state plan and one for-profit of the state plan. they are still being implemented now. they are not likely to be rolled out on a national basis, as was the original intention. --t there are other backstops they are another backstop intended to bring in more competition into states that may be lacking them. another is the co-ops. the federal government, the law provided large subsidies to set up brand-new insurance companies in some states. typically these are blue states like maryland, california -- guest: they were stopped midstride. they got defunded. guest: so it won't be in every state. but the point is that there may be limits to competition and that is
as well. a slight risk of strong storms into the central and upper mississippi river valleys. beautiful weather up in the west coast. 89 >>> 7:36. good tuesday morning to you. meteorologist christina loren. this is san jose. we have the same dark sky just about everywhere. overcast conditions for the first part of the day. we'll see a nice sunny finish. temperatures stay comfortable. 79 degrees on the way to livermore, 80 in fairfield, 77 concord and 74 degrees in beautiful redwood city for today. holding steady through thursday, then we'll crank the heat up come this weekend. hope you have a fantastic day. >>> don't forget any time you need that weather go to the weather channel or weather.com online, savannah. >>> all right. al, thank you so much. this morning on rossen reports, the summer months are peek moving season and some rogue companies are looking to take advantage of it. jeff rossen is on the case. good morning to you. >> we are here to help. a lot of us move. 35 million americans a year and when you hire a moving company you trust them with everything but authorities say com
, mississippi, marie, democratic caller in mississippi. the future of the democratic arty at this point, hiller -- hillary clinton is the sole standing. who she will take with her, that is questionable. she does not have much of a selection to choose from. after listening to her speech at the bar, it just reminded everyone how skilled she is. she is a lawyer. she understands constitutional law in this country as well as the national law. she's the best qualified in able to skills of being negotiate. it is the travesty of what happened in benghazi that i think it was very unprofessional and very undemocratic how the republican party tried to paint it is a very dangerous thing. some people do not want to have a military state in terms of how they run the embassies. it's very unfortunate that it but that is how the international goes. sabotaging the voting rights act, sabotaging the affordable health care act, making it look like something that it is when it isn't, everyone should be able to have health care. i don't know how many people can remember, but there was a time when you could not he den
into mississippi, it was pretty horrible. it was not all blamed on sherman. it was the collapse of the cotton market. the english went to india, egypt for cotton the last few years of the blockade, it broke them. 6000 union soldiers elected to settle in new orleans. it was not all like "gone with the wind." it was coming back, but it was a different culture. it would not be agricultural. it would not have that until later in the 19th century. host: the north was in the midst of a great big industrial revolution. the days of the big financiers on wall street. tell us about what was happening there. guest: thanks in part to the machinery of war. guest: it was a continuation of the war and an expansion, and they were getting ready for the centennial of the nation and showing off the advances that had been made in the past 100 years. most of those were technological advances, the old farming equipment to the new modern technology, transcontinental railroad, transportation was bringing people closer together, making it much easier to get cross-country. host: here are a few of the big things that h
thomas, the mother of three from mississippi at the new orleans saints training camp as a referee. >> and she is a member of the league's referee training program in line for an official full-time job. "gma" anchor josh elliott has her story. >> here we go. >> reporter: in the bold black and white stripes and hair tucked under that plaque hat, the official looks exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch your step here, 17. little tight. little tight. >> reporter: 39-year-old sarah thomas, married mother of three is on the verge of history. >> are you a tomboy? >> i am a tomboy, yes. but i am married with two boys. >> reporter: poised to become the first ever full time female official for the national football league. >> where's mama? >> 72, you've got to move up on those pass plays. put your guard up. put your guard up. individually, i am a female. a lot of things set us apart. race, gender, different background. but collectively, we're out there for the same goal. >> reporter: for 15 years, on fir -- officiating grade school, high school, and college games. discovered b
built a new peline that feeds the jynt wrb refinery near st. louis across the mississippi river and to the refinery. all they have to do is double up on that pipeline, ship the oil down. might cost more in the long run but who know what is they're paying for land leases to the gulf coast. so it's a way to get around the problem. the right of way is already there. you never hear anybody mention it. host: a couple of international stories for you. from the financial times this morning, host: john from boston, massachusetts. caller: i've been watching for a while, what i've learned about politics is sometimes we have a problem i think in this country it's not so much the country any more it has become love of party. i've been watching and no matter what politician you look at in the united states, no matter state or federal, it's become love of party. and where -- they represent the people.shouldn't they doing the for the people? host: doug from springfield. good morning. caller: good morning. my question would be i appreciate you guys and everything you do. i would like some answe
direction. florida, georgia, michigan, mississippi. these are states that have been difficult to target. i think over time you want to see how the numbers do. the concern for some time is these children had about a five-time likelihood of growing up to be obese adults as well. the problem is coming. this is the first time we have seen sustained improvement. >> the states are all over the country. it's not concentrated in one region at all. is there a reason, a cause for h this drop at this point? >> we're not entirely sure. we asked the same question. >> of course. >> i would say this is the kitchen sink mentality. the obesity epidemic, throw everything at the problem to see what sticks. that was good probably. the hard part is trying to figure out what worked. one clue is ta the low income children being affected points to federal subsidy programs as a possible cause, a benefit. wic and food stamp programs have regulated what people can buy to eat. much more healthy buying going on. decrease ing sugary drinks. also breastfeeding. there is a sustained effort. it makes a difference. childre
appendectomy at a hospital in jackson, mississippi. the 71-year-old is expected to make a full recovery. >>anna: 32 minutes after the hour. how do you stop government leaks? get rid of the humans. a new dramatic step that is just being announced by the n.s.a. director at its cyber security conference. the plan, replace computer system administrators with machines. >> what we are in the process of doing, but not fast enough, is reducing our system administrators by about 90% for the first reason, which was to make our networks more defensible and more secure. >>anna: this plan was apparently already in place before the leaks but is now being sped up. >>peter: overnight a wild police chase ends with a suspect's car crashing and flipping over. take a look with us. >> you're going to have to make a turn here. look at this. off to the dirt and through the fence and rolling. >>peter: it happened in california. the man behind the wheel accused of carjacking that kia van. after about 20 minutes he finally got out of the car with a few bumps and bruises and then surrendered to police. any choice? i don'
opportunity. let me conclude with this. generations, if this is 20th-century mississippi -- or 20th-century mali, young people have risked their safety and given their lives to give the -- get the education that has opened their potential. she spoke to and for the world's children. her message was clear. we want school and education for will child, and we continue the journey to our destination of these and education. nobody can stop us. we will speak up for our rights and bring change to our voice. all of you are helping to answer that call. i thank you for your service and your commitment, your creativity and courage. let's work together in individual nations and around the world until there are no more >> to fall through, no more barriers to run into and no more threats to their safety as they pursue their education and their dreams. if you want peace, work for justice, it has been said. we know this cuts to the root of if we wantallenge -- justice and peace, we must work for education. thank you so much, and i am happy to take your questions. [applause] >> is that working? mayb
:00 eastern time, 6:00 local time. robert is joining us, oxford, mississippi, independent line. turning back to the situation in egypt, 421 dead. your thoughts. caller: i want to throw in after hearing dave from texas, but i lived in cairo this past fall as a student. i wanted to say that the completelyere are spotless in comparison to the politics here. in regards to deception of the public, deception of the western media. a few minutesller ago, i have to agree with him, the muslim brotherhood is definitely trying to turn the western eye against the military. from what i can see when i was there, the reason -- there are a lot of deaths now, the muslim brotherhood are using force and are dying because of it because the military are defending themselves, but their were much fewer deaths earlier last fall because there protesters wanted democracy and there were peaceful process. the muslim brotherhood was using force. it looks bad for the military. that is my opinion. host: two were for the call. "usa today: egypt iraq than chaos. "washington times," one us in our generals to cairo? bestca's t
of the mississippi, 800 square miles right here in the middle of california. these cotton growers from the south were chased out by the bull weasel, came last and they claim this land, this blakely and. they took the rivers and dams them and shoved to the flow to places where they wanted to go cotton. at some point they had to go find labor. a number of folks came to the basin and their nerd is played out here. quite okies, bitchiness and black okies. no one had ever written about lack okies. they came in the 40s when this cotton picker was started in the fields. it could take the middle swath of the fields in the 40s and 50s, but it could not take the edge of the rows. so the black okies were working across the machine that would eventually idle them, picking the edges of the cotton and in 10 years time they were idled. the women ended up becoming mates and housekeepers for wealthy white farmers, much like the south. and the men, where they occurred, found work. many of them were idled. the children left this place. when we came upon it, it was mostly old folks. when i wrote my last book, west of th
collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the senate passed a bipartisan
of biloxi but trust me, from mississippi, alabama, georgia, even into the carolinas, there are many neighborhoods that are beginning to look like this. atlanta's had its yearly rainfall total and we still have four months to go in the year. really wet season and more rain coming. in the purple-shaded area, which is much of the southeast, 1 to 2 inches of additional rain from all this gulf moisture right in that charleston, columbia, raleigh area. raleigh, tough for you too. 2 to 3 inches of rain of the tough, tough story and continues today. >>> good monday morning. i'm abc7 news meteorologist mike nicco. unusual weather pattern fronts, thunderstorms and high fire danger through wednesday. today temperatures a little above average and with the humidity it will feel a little stuffy, especially in the east bay where we'll hit the 90s. you can see the 70s throughout the bay shore. tonight we'll cool back into the 60s. it will be kind of stuffy when you step outside tomorrow. once >> all that weather was brought to you by angie's list. when we come back we'll talk about the warm-up. i k
that residents of utah, california and massachusetts google the most. people in mississippi, arkansas and west virginia google the least. >> the testing company act says just a quarter of this year's high school graduates who took the act tests have the reading, math, english and science skills they need to succeed in college or a career. the results indicate that thousands of students graduate from high schools without the knowledge necessary for the next steps in life. the data also show a downturn in overall student scores, although company officials attribute the slide to updated standards and more students taking the exams - including those with no intention of attending two- or four-year colleges. >> kia is recalling more than 9,700 suvs in the u.s. and canada because the front axle can fail and the vehicles can lose power. the recall affects 2014 sorento suvs with 2.4-liter four-cylinder engines and front-wheel-drive. they were built from jan. 7 through march 12 of this year. kia says the right axle drive shaft can crack and fail. if that happens, the suvs can lose power or roll away wh
to the summer of 1955 to the killing of emma ll. a 14-year-old african-american boy, and went to mississippi to be with an spawn uncle and cousin and is lynched. dragged out of the bed in the middle of the night by a white bomb and -- mob and ends up in the body of the river. when emma's body was found, -- emmett was 14, she was 14 when she dee integrated the central high school in, a. but emmett, when his body was sent back to chicago, his mother, maimy till, wasn't an activist, she was forced into this. losing her only child. she said she wanted the casket open for the wake and the funeral. she wanted the world to see the ravages of racism. the brutality of big industry. thousands streamed by his casket and saw, and then jet magazine, another black publication, took photographed of the disextendded, mutilated head, and they were published and seared into the history and consciousness of this country. she had something very important to teach the press. show the pictures. show the images. cue imagine if for just one week we saw the images of war, every newspaper had a picture of a dead baby
was in the march. i was in the mississippi delta when i got a call from friends who say bayard said if you want to work on the march, it's going to happen. get yourself on to a plane and come to new york. and that's how i got to be on the staff of the march. one of the seminole experiences of my lich. >> 50 years ago today. we'll return to today's commemoration of the march later in the show. >>> president obama to do something about the horrifying carnage in syria. anything he can do? a live report is next. can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffness, and to help stop joint damage. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. yo
from katrina: how my mississippi hometown lost it all what mattered." i want to ask a brief question. how do you get cities to be willing to invest in resilience in the tough times in something that might happen. preparing for the possible when they are dealing with so many presses issues right now, again, the economy, crime,th. >> thank you. i would like jane first to lead off about a project might be working on. >> david mentioned that i'm working on a project, i have been because we have been so blessed in joplin and certainly not become experts by any mean. i think we have a set of practical experience. i've collected so far about 40 essays from people across all sector of joplin who are vod -- involved in recovery from the hospital chief to the city manager to the superintendent of schools about what we learn in the first year we think are lessons can pass on what we wish wed had known. the more i publicly state my goal the more it has to happen. i'm hoping i'll be done with it by the end of september and able to give it out to anyone in a way that is interested in a community o
of frank sinatra. ms. cel-- mississippi kelley's most recent book, "capturing camelot." very well photographed, obviously, and very well put together. personally, these picture books mean a lot more to me when the captions are well researched and thought out and a bit more prose than you would normally find which is what ms. kelley did with this book. never failing to raise a few eyebrows while uncovering stories and doing such a wonderfully painful job of reminding us our heroes are very, very human, please welcome to the festival kitty kelley. [applause] >> the only part of that introduction that isn't quite right is the prolific. it takes me four years -- >> i heard it from someone. >> no, you've got to be careful. [laughter] prolific as a turtle. it takes me four years usually on each book. but this one, this book was a labor of love because stanley tretick was one of my very best friends, and he was one of president kennedy's favorite photographers. and i used to go visit stanley in washington. and one time i asked him what he had in the marine corps locker that he used as hi
above mississippi. >>> and apple co-founder steve wozniak offering his review of "jobs" with ashton kutchers ahis former partner. steve likes ashton better in "that '70s show" let's just say. >>> futures lower after the longest losing streak since december for stocks. the dow down for four consecutive trading days losing 440 points. >>> the irs sent out letters to 20,000 small business owners over the past year notifying them of possible income underreporting. the irs thinks businesses that get most of their sales through credit cards may be underreporting their cash transactions. cnn money has a list of places where homes are the most affordable and your income goes the farthest. top, altemon springs, florida. >> we norman hat tan. we had red flag warnings in the area, talking about strong winds and dry lightning, eventually we'll get more moisture and see rain hit the ground and that will bring relief toward the second half of the week but it will take some time. >>> rain, way too much of it, in the southeast, one to two inches of rain still possible, three to four inches possible
processing plant in mississippi a couple of miles from the state penitentiary, they have a program that allows prisoners to leave and make $6 per hour processing chickens. they said they have never had a prisoner last more than two days cleaning chickens. that they would rather be in their cells in prison than work in the chicken processing plant because it is such hard, dirty, nasty work. we are seeing the same thing in arizona. picking lettuce, there are no american workers lining up to do those jobs. host: a couple more tweets -- guest: if there were? oh, well, a dirtly littlesecret about immigration, if you wanted to come to the united states and clean a hotel room or work in a service sector that is not agriculture, there is no way for you to come to this country to work. there is especially no way for you to stay. we do not have a visa category that addresses these people. while we do have an agriculture program, it is small and difficult to use and many employers do not use it. in california they say that 70% of agriculture workers are here illegally and only 4% of the total
euphemism mississippi appendectomy to give voice to the experience of poor black women in the south who were sterilized against their knowledge, an issue that has been in the news in the last couple of of weeks in hell of vonya and lastly i want to offer for you the black and the party was a health social movements. the black panther movement is a rorschach test for how we think about blacks politics in the last 20th century in particular but what we don't appreciate so much is that they were deeply engage and involved in issues of health activism health equality and access to medical care services in the united states. in particular as i discussed in my book they were engaged in getting people information to access to services that were under mentioned that we didn't know enough about, that the services were underutilized or not provided enough for such as sickle cell amenia -- a mania -- sickle cell anemia. harry its prior look that many of you probably know medical apartheid the black panther party was engaged in protecting black minis from overexposure to the bad forces of medical experi
a barge down the mississippi, tanker cars, or trucks. >> there's a story that was first report bid the hill newspaper saying that the e he on would likely be uld -- >> that's actedly not a new storyifment that came out a couple years ago and was investigated. and my understanding is there were no conflicts found. what you're starting to see is a recycling of a lot of events. keep in mind that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite cross-border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this is now taking longer again, we could have built the empire state building five times by now, we completed world war ii in less time. so at some point you start to say, we've had four studies. we've had this, we've had that. at some point the question is has this policy really been high jacked or are we still on path? > eric from our democrat's line. >> we have environmental studies. we've also had practical xperience with spills. i don't know where o you're getting your safety record from, the 99.999%. if one of these pipelin
with this. for generations, 20th century mississippi here on 21st century somali. they have risked their safety and given their live to get the education that will unlock their full potential. it from the podium, she spoke to and for the world's children. her message was clear, we want schools and education for every child's bright future. we will continue our journey to our destination of peace and education. no one can stop us. we will speak up for our rights and bring change through our voice. all of you are helping to answer that call. i thank you for your service, your commitment, your creativity, and your courage. let's work together in individual nations and around the world until there are no cracks for students to fall through. no more barriers to run in to. and no more threat of their safety as they pursue their education and their dreams. it's been said that if you want peace, wok for justice. we know that one solution cuts to the root, cuts to the very heart of the challenges con flingting our collective humanity. if we want both justice and peace we must work for educa
can do how can we serve and then power them. in 1963 in jackson, mississippi, angry protesters and armed police prevented any massacre after the murder of edgar evans. that was a kind of lawyer and later that he was. years later he gave me his photo with a description from tennyson's eula says. .. and particularly the american bar association. thank you all very much. [applause] hillary clinton wrapping up her remarkings in san francisco. we are going to take you live with the national prez club and a discussion underway a minute ago on the role of government affairs officers and whether they help or hinder government transparency. live coverage on c-span2. >> the panelist presentations will be available on paoand reporters pao in public affairs officers and a and d reporters at blog spot. com. as a reporter i should disclose that i'm biased in favor of as much openness and disclosure as possible and as few rules as possible about who can talk to reporters in the federal government, and how. but i also recognize and i really mean this. the public affairs has an indispensable j
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